Chrome 51 for Android eventually Abandons ‘Merge Tabs and Apps’ choice

After releasing Chrome fifty one for computer in may additionally, the organization has now also launched a Chrome fifty one update for Android. The app gets a few worm fixes, even as additionally reintroducing the antique tabs function that become removed in 2014.

Chrome 51 for Android Finally Abandons 'Merge Tabs and Apps' Option

The state-of-the-art model is to be had on Google Play wherein it can be downloaded free of charge. The update brings returned the default tabs layout that it had killed in 2014 with the introduction of Android Lollipop. It had then introduced the ‘Merge tabs and apps’ characteristic that placed tabs into the app switcher instead of multi functional region. The exchange become now not familiar nicely with the aid of users, and Google has subsequently decided to go into reverse and reintroduce the vintage tab format as default, while getting rid of the merge alternative altogether.

apart from this, the update largely focuses on protection enhancements and malicious program fixes. As noted in advance, Google Chrome for laptop also got an replace to version 51 in advance. It brought along a complete of forty two safety fixes. The update claims to lessen electricity consumption via up to 30 percent, with a revamped off-screen frame rendering gadget. which means videos, pix and other media inside the history will now not be rendered unnecessarily.

It also brought the new Credential management API, which basically objectives to control passwords higher, or remove their need altogether. this can enable web sites to have interaction with Chrome immediately, and developers can inadvertently allow users to ‘signal-in with simply one tap’ while required.

HTC A9 Aero To Come With Android Marshmallow

HTC One

HTC are holding a press event on the 29th of September, the company is expected to announce their latest smartphone at the event, the HTC A9.

We have already seen a photo of the new HTC A9 and heard some of the handsets specifications and now it looks like the device will come with Android Marshmallow.

According to LlabTooFeR, the new HTC A9 which was previously knows as the HTC Aero will come with Android 6.0 and HTC’s Sense 7.

 

The handset is rumored to come with a 5.2 inch display with a QHD resolution of 2560 x 1440 pixels, the display will apparently be a 2.5D display with Gorilla Glass 4. Processing on the handset is said to come in the form of a MediaTek Helo X20 processor which is a 10 core processor.

Other rumored specifications on the handset include 4GB of RAM, we can also expect a choice of storage options on the device.

As yet there are no details on what cameras the handset will come with, as soon as we get some more details on the device, and also some more photos of the handset, we will let you guys know.

6 ways to take control of your Android apps

6 ways to take charge of your Android appsYou’ve got a lot more power over your various Android apps than you might think. For example, you can decide when and how your apps update themselves, or whether they get to install home-screen shortcuts automatically. If you feel an app is slowing down your handset, you can shut it down, or clear the “cache” of a storage-hogging app. You can even rein in an app that’s decided to become the default for your device’s core features (like the camera, or the clock).

Read on for six ways to take control of your Android apps, starting with…

Note: the following tips are for phones and tablets running on the Lollipop version of Android and using the Google Now launcher. The steps may vary for devices running customized versions of Android.

Shut down an app that’s using too much memory (or is otherwise cramping your style)

Your Android device can only do so many things at once. If just one of your apps gets too greedy with the modest amount of memory on your phone or tablet, your handset’s performance may slow to a crawl.

Shut down an app that’s using too much memoryBEN PATTERSON
Got a memory-hogging app on your phone? There’s an easy way to stop it in its tracks.

Luckily, there’s an easy way to find out which of your apps is using the most memory—and once you pinpoint the culprit, you can stop the app in its tracks. Doing so won’t delete the app, mind you; instead, think of it as pulling the plug until you relaunch the misbehaving application.

  • Tap Settings > Apps, then swipe to the Running tab.
  • Scroll through the list of apps. If you see anything that’s using an inordinate amount of memory, go ahead and tap it. (Don’t worry, you haven’t done anything to the app yet.)
  • Tap Stop to close the app, but make sure to heed any warnings above the Stop button. Think long and hard before stopping a core Android or Settings process. You’ll know them by their telltale Android and gear icons—and generally speaking, you should leave them alone. Don’t be surprised when an app you stop no longer works (especially in the case of messaging apps).

Bonus tip: If a memory-hogging app seems particularly unstable, you can tap the Report button (right next to the Stop button) to send a complaint to Google.

Clear all the data of a storage-hogging app

Memory isn’t the only precious resource your various Android apps are using on your device; there’s also storage, the vault of data on your handset that will, sooner or later, begin running out of room.

Clear the “cache” or all the data of a storage-hogging appBEN PATTERSON
You can junk an app’s temporary “cache” files in just a few taps.

Some apps, like games, are just plain big, gobbling up gigabyte-sized chunks of storage. Others, like podcast managers or document readers, aren’t all that large themselves, but the files they handle can get fairly hefty. And just about every app on your phone or tablet lays claim to small “caches” of temporary data that, taken together, can add up to hundreds of megabytes.

As with your device’s memory, you can check how much storage your Android apps are using, and you can quickly delete their data caches, which can usually be tossed without causing any grief. You could also nix all their data, which will free up more storage, but could wipe out your personal settings and potentially crucial files.

  • Tap Settings > Storage > Apps, find an app that might be using more than its fair share of storage (you can also tap the three-dot button in the corner of the screen and select Sort by size), and check the size of its cache and stored data.
  • Tap Clear Cache to clean out the app’s temporary data, or Clear Data to zap all the app’s stored data—keeping in mind, of course, that the latter option will wipe any personalized settings, documents, media files, or anything else you’ve created, collected, edited or otherwise saved using the app.

Bonus tip: You can delete cached data files for all your apps at once by tapping Settings> Storage > Cached data, then tap OK when the ‘Clear cached data?’ pop-up appears.

Decide whether apps can auto-update themselves

By default, your Android phone or tablet regularly checks in with the Google Play app store to see if any updates are available—and if there are any, the updates will be downloaded and installed automatically.

Decide whether apps can auto-update themselvesBEN PATTERSON
If you’d rather update your apps manually, there’s a setting for that.

That’s the default behavior for your apps, anyway. If you’d rather update your apps manually, there’s a setting for that.

  • Launch the Play Store app, tap the menu button in the top-left corner of the screen, then tap Settings > Auto-update apps.
  • Now, go ahead and pick a setting. Among your options: Don’t auto-update apps at all, auto-update apps over Wi-Fi only (a smart choice for anyone with a capped cellular data plan), or auto-update apps any time there’s a data connection, Wi-Fi and cellular data included.

Stop an app from taking over your phone’s browser, camera, or other core feature

If you install, say, a new web browser on your Android device, you’ll eventually be asked which of your current browsers you’d like to use to open a link in a non-browser app (like Gmail). If you tap “Always” after picking a browser, the app you chose will become the default browser for every link you open moving ahead.

Stop an app from taking over your phone’s browser, camera, or other core featureBEN PATTERSON
You can ask your Android device to “forget” any default actions for a specific app.

So far, so good. But what if you change your mind? There’s no easy way to directly pick a new default browser (or chat app, camera app, etc.), but you can ask your device to “forget” any default actions for a specific app. Once you’ve reset an app’s default behavior (such as for your browser), you’ll eventually be asked which app you’d like to use for a specific action (such as opening URLs).

Just tap Settings > Apps, pick an app from the Downloaded list, scroll down to the Launch by Default heading, then tap Clear Defaults.

Bonus tip: For a shortcut to an app’s App Info screen (where you’ll find the Clear Data, Clear Cache, and Clear Defaults buttons), open your device’s app drawer (for most Android handsets, tap the center button at the bottom of the screen), tap and hold an app’s icon, then drag it up and into the App Info icon.

Stop apps from installing shortcut icons on the home screen

No, you’re not imagining things: Your home screen is getting more and more cluttered. The reason: each time you install a new app, it automatically adds its own shortcut icon to your home screen.

Stop apps from installing shortcut icons on the home screenBEN PATTERSON
Keep your home screen from getting cluttered by stopping new apps from auto-adding home-screen shortcuts.

If you’d rather new apps left your home screen alone until you decided to create a shortcut on your own, here’s what you can do: Open the Play Store app, tap the menu button, tap Settings, then clear out the checkbox labeled ‘Add icon to Home screen.’

Keep an app from setting off alerts, or let an app give you more alerts

Some apps just don’t know when to stop when it comes to alerts and notifications—and indeed, you’ve probably got some pushy apps that you’d like to shut up, permanently.

Keep an app from setting off alerts, or let an app give you more alertsBEN PATTERSON
You can permanently muzzle an app’s notifications—or, on the flip side, allow an app to send you even more alerts than it normally would.

On the flip side, maybe there’s an app on your phone or tablet you’d like to hear more from, with its alerts and notifications popping onto your screen even when your handset is set to Priority mode (which screens all but the most important calls and messages).

To tinker with an app’s notification settings, try this:

  • Tap Settings > Sound & notification > App notifications, then pick an app from the list.
  • Toggle on the Block setting to muzzle all of an app’s notifications, or flip on the Priority setting to make sure an app’s alerts appear above most others, and continue to ding while Priority mode is on.

Don’t use waterproof Xperia phones underwater, Sony says

26 xperia z3Sony Mobile is changing its stance over its waterproof phones. Apparently, when the company says Xperia phones are waterproof, it just means that if you try to use them underwater you’ll end up with proof that H2O can destroy your phone. Well, not quite—but Sony’s got a lot of explaining to do.

The company was not available for comment at this writing. We’ll update this article should the company respond.

The waterproof explanation page for Sony Mobile Xperia phones now includes the following disclaimer, “Remember not to use the device underwater,” as first noted byXperia Blog. That’s a surprising turnaround considering the company has advertised Xperia waterproof phones with images of people using their phones underwater.

Xperia waterproof phones typically have an IP65/68 rating, which means they are completely resistant to dust, can resist low-pressure water jet spray for at least 3 minutes, and can remain functional after immersion below a minimum 1 meter (3.28 feet) depth.

The problem seems to be that when Sony tested each device to achieve its IP rating the test wasn’t exactly rigorous. “Sony devices that are tested for their waterproof abilities are placed gently inside a container filled with tap water and lowered to a depth of 1.5 meters,” Sony’s waterproof page says. “After 30 minutes in the container, the device is gently taken out and its functions and features are tested.”

In practical terms this means Xperia waterproof phones can stand up to a heavy rainstorm, a non-water immersing web browsing session in the bath, or a run under the bathroom faucet. But all those shots of fun loving people taking videos in lakes and chlorine-laden swimming pools? That’s pushing it.

xperiaz3vdive
So can I take it underwater or not, Sony?

At least according to some pages. As Xperia Blog points out, other parts of Sony Mobile’s site still encourage you todive underwater with your device.

For the most part, however, Sony warns you on the limits of its non-waterproof waterproof phones. Case in point is the company’s Xperia M4 Aqua. Dubbed the “waterproof camera phone for everyone” it has this under the fine print: “You should not put the device completely underwater or expose it to seawater, salt water, chlorinated water, or liquids such as drinks. Abuse and/or improper use of the device will invalidate warranty.”

The impact on you at home: If you have an Xperia waterproof phone you should heed Sony’s warning even if you’ve taken underwater shots with your phone in the past. Should it get damaged during such an excursion, Sony could refuse to help and point to its support materials that warn against taking them into the water. Sure, it has tons of marketing materials encouraging the opposite, but those images aren’t to be taken literally, it seems.

The new Android Pay app offers a sneak peek at support for loyalty programs, special offers

android payAndroid Pay is finally here, giving you Google’s latest attempt to muscle its way into the mobile payment space.

But Google also has ambitions beyond just turning your phone into a debit card. Inannouncing Android Pay, the company said the app will store your gift cards, loyalty cards, and special offers. And soon, redeem them and pay all with a single tap of your phone. A peek at the version 1.0 APK uncovers that some of these features have snuck their way out, although not all of them are quite ready.

This could make your phone a more powerful option for making payments at an electronics store, supermarket, or coffee shop as you won’t have to remember to pull out your rewards card and have the cashier scan it.

android pay loyalty cardsANDROID POLICE
Redeeming loyalty rewards may be much easier with Android Pay.

If you’ve used Google Wallet you may already have a number of accounts set up with different retailers, as keeping these all in one place was one of the best features of that app. Being able to pay for an item and automatically get a free beverage, money off the purchase, or another perk without having to think about it would be a tremendous upside.

Android Police found plenty of code and a couple of screenshots that indicate there’s a feature coming called Auto Redeem. However, the list of supported vendors is rather few, so Google may still be working behind the scenes at putting partnerships in place.

Why this matters: Mobile NFC payments are cool, but they still haven’t quite become as commonplace as using a debit/credit card. The technology got its biggest boost withApple Pay, much to the chagrin of Google and Android fans who had been using Google Wallet for years. But only now have retailers started to embrace Apple and Google’s solutions, so we’re just beginning to see what’s possible with mobile payments.

Project Fi works with Moto X Pure Edition

Project Fi Google Wireless ServiceThe Moto X Pure Edition has a hidden trick: it works with Google’s Project Fi.

ZDNet’s Kevin C. Tofel discovered this when he popped his Project Fi SIM card into his new Moto X Pure Edition. It worked, although with a few limitations. While he was able to get 16Mbps over HSPA+, there didn’t appear to be a full LTE connection. It’s also impossible to force a connection to Sprint, so he was only able to test it with T-Mobile and Wi-Fi.

However, staying on a phone call worked while hopping between Wi-Fi and a cellular signal.

Given that the Moto X Pure Edition is sold unlocked for use on any carrier, it’s not a terrible surprise to see it work. Given that Motorola partnered to build the Nexus 6 (the only phone officially supported by Project Fi), perhaps the Moto X will be the next phone to join the MVNO.

Why this matters: Project Fi is a rather compelling concept, as you only pay for the data you use and get to subscribe to a reasonably-priced plan. Google also engineered the Nexus 6 to automatically hop between Sprint, T-Mobile, and open Wi-Fi networks. However, the appeal is going to be limited as the Nexus 6 is too big for most. With a slightly smaller 5.7-inch screen, the Moto X may be a better fit.

Uprising is a freebie RPG, and Google Wallet gets personal with money

fivetotry sept11 leadWelcome to Five to Try, our weekly look at the new and updated Android apps and games that deserve your attention. Star Wars continues its Android assault this week with the release of Star Wars: Uprising, a role-playing quest set in the timeframe before this year’s The Force Awakens film. It’s joined on the gaming front this week by Minecraft: Pocket Edition, which gets a shout-out for a huge new update that lets you play alongside iOS and Windows users.

If games aren’t your thing, worry not: the top apps this week include the newly rebranded Google Wallet, which puts its new focus on personal payments. Besides that, MovieDay is a slick app that lets you track upcoming films (like…Star Wars?), while Adblock Browser might alleviate your worries about obnoxious or predatory web ads.

Star Wars: Uprising

fivetotry sept11 starwarsuprising
The combat in the short missions is pretty simplistic, but there’s lots of loot, gear, and abilities to amass over time.

Last week saw the Star Wars merchandizing machine roar back to life, delivering an array of toys and other goods—but also the launch of new fiction set between 1983’s Return of the Jedi and this fall’s sequel, The Force Awakens. Released this week, Star Wars: Uprising is another piece of that puzzle. It’s a free-to-play role-playing game that takes place during that timeframe, and it lets you create your own sci-fi adventurer.

Granted, you’re not going to rub elbows with Luke Skywalker or Han Solo in this one; it’s a less-central side story. But the dialogue is engaging, there’s an overarching narrative to unwind, and it takes place in familiar series locales like Hoth and Cloud City. The tap-and-shoot gunplay seems drab early on, but there’s plenty of gear and abilities to unlock, plus it has live online cooperative play. At the very least, Uprising seems like a solid-enough freebie diversion for die-hard fans.

Google Wallet

fivetotry sept11 googlewallet
Need to settle a debt? Pop in the amount and an email address and you can get it done with Wallet.

Android Pay’s NFC payment system has started rolling out in the United States, replacing the previous Google Wallet app—although as of this writing, it’s not showing up in the Play Store quite yet. But Google Wallet isn’t dead: it’s justcharting a new course, moving away from tap-and-pay and into the world of personal payments (like Square Cash or Venmo).

The new Wallet app dropped this week, and it’s all about sending—or requesting—money via an email address. You can link up a debit card or bank account to add funds or cash out anything received, and even request a physical card to use at ATMs, or anywhere Debit MasterCard is accepted. Google Wallet might not have been a contactless payment sensation, but it has new life for other money matters.

Minecraft: Pocket Edition

fivetotry sept11 minecraft
Look, it’s Steve! And pigs. This is co-op with an iPhone player, but Windows 10 users can get in on the fun too.

With tens of millions of paid downloads, Minecraft: Pocket Edition should be a known quantity by now—and it is, mostly. But Mojang has shown an admirable dedication to continue improving the game with major updates, and this week’s 0.12.1 release is a huge one.

Now, the block-based building sensation supports cross-platform multiplayerbetween Android, iOS, and the new Windows 10 Edition, letting up to five local players collaborate in the same game. I tried it out on a Galaxy Note 5 and an iPhone 6 and the feature worked flawlessly, making it easier than ever to link up with pals. And that’s not all: the update also brings physical gamepad support (finally!) and access to The Nether area in the game. If you haven’t played in a while, now’s the time to check back in.

MovieDay

fivetotry sept11 movieday
Love movies? Need to plan your social calendar around them? Start tracking upcoming releases with MovieDay.

We’re past the summer blockbuster season, but soon it’ll be time for studios to trickle out all the award-chasing flicks. And then there’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens. And the last Hunger Games film. And The Hateful Eight. Really, if you’re a film buff, the stream of must-see movies never ends, and it can be easy to lose track of what’s coming and when. That’s where MovieDay comes in.

MovieDay is simply an attractive, handy way to keep tabs on the films you’re excited to see—or browse for more potential candidates. You can scroll through the listings or search for something in particular, and once added to your list, the movie info will appear with a banner image and countdown clock. The app also tracks which movies you’ve seen, plus it allows easy access to trailers and production details.

Adblock Browser

fivetotry sept11 adblockbrowser
Adblock seems pretty capable as a mobile browser, plus it has all the titular blocking abilities available.

Ad blocking punishes the web publishing industry, so excuse me if I’m notterribly enthused about this week’s release of the Adblock Browser for Android. But while blanket blocking of ads fails to consider their purpose (paying for the content), Adblock Browser does also allow you to disable specific types of obnoxious or data-tracking ads, and allow less-obtrusive ads to still shine through.

And you can whitelist sites, so the ones you like and trust (Hi!) still get ad revenue from the content you consume. Beyond those headline features, Adblock otherwise seems pretty capable as a mobile browser: pages load pretty quickly, getting around is straightforward enough, and it has options like private browsing and requesting a site’s desktop version. I’ll stick with Chrome (and supporting creators), but if you want it, Adblock is now on the Play Store.

Cyanogen chief plans to integrate Cortana, calling Windows Phone ‘dead’

cortanaforandroidWindows Phone might be a failure, according to Cyanogen chief Kirt McMaster, but that’s okay: He plans to take Microsoft’s Cortana digital assistant and make it his own.

In an interview with the International Business Times, McMaster said that he planned to take Cortana—available as an app on the Android platform—and integrate it with the next version of the Cyanogen operating system.

McMaster sees Cortana as an app in search of a good home—a home that Cyanogen could provide. “Natural language coupled with intelligence is very important, but as an application it doesn’t rally[sic] work, because you need to be embedded into the framework of the OS because that is where you get all the signal from the services that makes that intelligence smarter,” McMaster told the paper. Taking those signals—from email, a calendar, location, and more—is the backbone of most modern operating systems, and the way that an OS provider can turn user info into a product it can pitch to advertisers.

Why this matters: Cyanogen’s pitch to bake in Cortana is interesting from two perspectives. Cortana would offer a clear differentiator for the Android spinoff. If Microsoft did license Cortana to Cyanogen, that would signal a possible backup plan for the software giant: If it can’t manage to sell its OS to hardware makers and consumers, pushing services like Cortana (and Outlook, Bing, and others) to a broad consumer base may be just as good.

Getting away from Google Now

Of course, Android already has a digital assistant: Google Now. That apparently doesn’t mean much to McMaster, however, who sees Google as a competitor, not a partner: in March, he told Forbes that he is “putting a bullet through Google’s head.”

Google Now is baked into Android, however, while Cortana is not. McMaster plans to take what Microsoft has so far left out of Cortana as an app—the ability to control services in the OS, including settings and other applications—and build it in.

Currently, Cortana on Android and iOS serves as sort of a supercharged search engine, parsing inquiries via natural language, setting reminders and issuing alerts—and not much else. But McMaster also praised Cortana as being better than Apple’s Siri, and, in some cases, better than Google Now itself.

It’s unclear how McMaster and Cyanogen will be able to integrate Cortana, however, without Microsoft’s help. The way McMaster spun it, he lumped Windows Phones, Ubuntu and Firefox together as mobile operating systems that are “dead in the water,” but positioned Cyanogen’s relatively meager market share as an asset.

“Having a company that has no legacy business, that has no dependencies, means that we can open up opportunities for third parties that the incumbent OS creators don’t,” he said.

Whether Microsoft would just hand over the keys to the kingdom, as it were, remains to be seen.

This nasty Android ransomware changes your phone’s PIN code

porn droid warningResearchers at security company ESET have found a type of malware that changes an Android device’s PIN, the first of its kind in an ever-evolving landscape of ransomware attacks.

For most users, the only option to get rid of the malware is to reset the phone to its factory settings, which unfortunately also deletes all the data on the device.

The malware calls itself “Porn Droid” and bills itself as a viewer for adult content. It has only been seen on third-party Android application marketplaces or forums for pirated software, wrote Lukas Stefanko, an ESET malware analyst.

But after it’s installed, users see a warning supposedly from the FBI that they’ve allegedly viewed “prohibited pornography.” It asks for a US$500 fine to be paid within three days.

To change the device’s PIN, Porn Droid needs administrator-level access to the phone.  Stefanko wrote that the malware uses a new method to obtain that high level of access.

When Porn Droid runs, it asks people to click a button to activate the viewer app. But beneath that window, and obscured by it, is another button for setting device administer privileges.

porn droid 2ESET
Porn Droid tricks a user into granting admin access through deceptive windows.

“After clicking on the button, the user’s device is doomed,” Stefanko wrote. “The Trojan app has obtained administrator rights and now can lock the device. And even worse, it sets a new PIN for the lock screen.”

Other kinds of Android malware locked the screen by keeping the ransonware warning in the foreground using an infinite loop. But that could be remedied by using a command-line tool, the Android debug bridge, or deactivating admin rights in Safe Mode, according to Stefanko.

In the case of Porn Droid, if someone tries to deactivate the admin privileges, the malware uses a call-back function to reactivate them, Stefanko wrote.

The malware is also coded to try to shut down three mobile antivirus products: Dr. Web, ESET’s Mobile Security and Avast.

More advanced users may be able to get rid of Porn Droid without resetting and erasing all data on their phone. It is possible to remove the malware if a user has root privileges to the device, and some security software can stop it, Stefanko wrote.

Ransomware attacks, both desktop and mobile, have become some of the most persistent and damaging scams on the Internet. One of the most prevalent scams is encrypting a person’s files and asking for money for the files to be decrypted.

Security experts generally advise not paying the ransom, as in many cases fraudsters never bother to fix the victim’s computer.

Don’t use waterproof Xperia phones underwater, Sony says

Sony Mobile is changing its stance over its waterproof phones. Apparently, when the company says Xperia phones are waterproof, it just means that if you try to use them underwater you’ll end up with proof that H2O can destroy your phone. Well, not quite—but Sony’s got a lot of explaining to do.

The company was not available for comment at this writing. We’ll update this article should the company respond.

The waterproof explanation page for Sony Mobile Xperia phones now includes the following disclaimer, “Remember not to use the device underwater,” as first noted byXperia Blog. That’s a surprising turnaround considering the company has advertised Xperia waterproof phones with images of people using their phones underwater.

Xperia waterproof phones typically have an IP65/68 rating, which means they are completely resistant to dust, can resist low-pressure water jet spray for at least 3 minutes, and can remain functional after immersion below a minimum 1 meter (3.28 feet) depth.

The problem seems to be that when Sony tested each device to achieve its IP rating the test wasn’t exactly rigorous. “Sony devices that are tested for their waterproof abilities are placed gently inside a container filled with tap water and lowered to a depth of 1.5 meters,” Sony’s waterproof page says. “After 30 minutes in the container, the device is gently taken out and its functions and features are tested.”

In practical terms this means Xperia waterproof phones can stand up to a heavy rainstorm, a non-water immersing web browsing session in the bath, or a run under the bathroom faucet. But all those shots of fun loving people taking videos in lakes and chlorine-laden swimming pools? That’s pushing it.

xperiaz3vdive
So can I take it underwater or not, Sony?

At least according to some pages. As Xperia Blog points out, other parts of Sony Mobile’s site still encourage you todive underwater with your device.

For the most part, however, Sony warns you on the limits of its non-waterproof waterproof phones. Case in point is the company’s Xperia M4 Aqua. Dubbed the “waterproof camera phone for everyone” it has this under the fine print: “You should not put the device completely underwater or expose it to seawater, salt water, chlorinated water, or liquids such as drinks. Abuse and/or improper use of the device will invalidate warranty.”

The impact on you at home: If you have an Xperia waterproof phone you should heed Sony’s warning even if you’ve taken underwater shots with your phone in the past. Should it get damaged during such an excursion, Sony could refuse to help and point to its support materials that warn against taking them into the water. Sure, it has tons of marketing materials encouraging the opposite, but those images aren’t to be taken literally, it seems.